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  Post #24 (permalink)   11-02-2016, 05:07 AM
Alex HubRocket
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Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 811

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Quote:
Originally Posted by whmcsguru View Post
No, actually it's not 'good' that they're doing this based on client count.

#1: This will cost them money in the longrun. If they did things properly (a flat out , across the board raise), this would make them money.

#2: They offer nothing additional at all. Nothing.

So, a client with 1 client gets the same, exact service as a client with 1500, yet that client with 1500 clients gets charged almost 3x as much, simply because 'tax'.

That's essentially what this is a 'tax' system. It's horrific to say the least. There's no justification for it, except because they're WHMCS.

These people don't contact WHMCS more (in fact, honestly, it's the other way around), they don't require more support, they don't get much anything different from WHMCS... So, why, again should they be forced to pay more?
You have to think bigger than that. Changing prices across the board could have costed them MUCH more AND had a much more negative impact. It isn't as simple as you describe it and certainly not the only 'proper' way of raising prices.

If they raised prices across the board, smaller companies would look at alternatives such as Blesta. This could have a huge impact on their market share. Also, when you increase prices across the board you have to take into account the other sold prices, specifically the reseller program. If you're having $25 and $40 licenses then have some companies offering licenses for $5 - $6, people might find a company that offers WHMCS at a much cheaper rate and get it from them. Solution? Raise the prices on the reseller licenses forcing companies to evaluate all of their reseller package pricing etc Outcome? Companies will turn to resell other platforms such as Blesta in order to keep their reseller package pricing consistent.

Once Blesta or X alternative gains enough market share more companies may decide they want to resell it instead of WHMCS and given an across the board price increase, that makes sense.

The way they have done it can be considered 'proper' though not the only way. Smaller companies have no impact, if you have fewer than X clients you'll still pay the same rate.

Number 2 isn't exactly true neither. Larger companies do get more from WHMCS, more time saved. Now feature-wise etc sure, it isn't fair but when you're large enough it doesn't matter if you're paying $15 or $40. The turn on that is huge, especially as you grow. As you grow you have more clients, much more automation taking place which translates into much more time being saved. It isn't fair but it isn't a bummer for most companies that have packed their products reasonably.

To end this, if +$9 whilst having 250 - 1000 clients is worth the effort of all your posts then you probably need to look at your pricing.