Get Paid to Participate - up to $1 per post!     Twitter     Facebook     Google+
Hosting Discussion
 

Hosting Discussion > Web Hosting Forums > Web Hosting Discussion > Confused on what is a "proper" GB in term of diskspace and bandwidth.
forgot password?



Reply


Old
  Post #1 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 08:48 AM
HD Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 141

Status: Harv45 is online now
Hi, I am confused on what is considered a "proper" GB of bandwidth and diskspace.

Here what I means..
1,000MB=1GB
or
1,024MB=1GB

as some places says the first while others says the second.
 
 
 


Old
  Post #2 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 09:48 AM
HD Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 4

Status: plusplus is offline
The exact one is 1,024Mb
 
 


Old
  Post #3 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 10:45 AM
HD Management Staff
 
Artashes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 9,721

Status: Artashes is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by plusplus View Post
The exact one is 1,024Mb
That is correct.

Harv45, many companies choose to round the numbers of space/bandwidth specifications, but that's only done for presentation purposes.
 
 
 


Old
  Post #4 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 12:01 PM
HD Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 141

Status: Harv45 is online now
Quote:
Originally Posted by plusplus View Post
The exact one is 1,024Mb
Thanks you for the information, the provider I am at said that they treat a GB as 1,000MB and not 1,024MB as I thought I should be getting pr GB. With that said should I just get a refund for them not telling me at purchase? Since the package only said..
5GB Diskspace
50GB Bandwidth

And I am not getting those specs that I paid for (since they told me AFTER purchase that a GB is 1,000MB is how they treat it).
 
 
 


Old
  Post #5 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 12:05 PM
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 969

Status: Collabora is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harv45 View Post
Hi, I am confused on what is considered a "proper" GB of bandwidth and diskspace.

Here what I means..
1,000MB=1GB
or
1,024MB=1GB
And you have every reason to be confused. The answer is actually more complicated than the ones given so far. Let's take a closer look.

The usual (base 10) meaning of the prefix giga- is one billion, so one would expect the term gigabyte to refer to one billion bytes. However, when we talk about digital information we are in the binary world of base 2. The power of 2 which comes closest to 1 billion is 30. In other words

1GB = 2^30 = 1,073,741,824 bytes

There is a different notation for the binary version. For a binary GB we use GiB (GiB = gibi = giga binary), and so

1 KB = 1,000 bytes
1 KiB (kibi) = 2^10 bytes = 1024 bytes

1 MB = 1,000 KB = 1,000,000 bytes
1 MiB (mebi) = 2^20 bytes = 1024 KiBs = 1,048,576 bytes

1 GB = 1,000 MB = 1,000,000,000 bytes
1 GiB (gibi) = 2^30 bytes = 1024 MiBs = 1,073,741,824 bytes

1 TB = 1,000 GB = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes
1 TiB (tebi) = 2^40 bytes = 1024 GiBs = 1,099,511,627,776 bytes


In general, the binary version is used for memory and data transmission and the base 10 version for hard drives and storage (sometimes!). Some OSes (Windows) will use the binary value when reporting disk space and file sizes and other OSes the decimal value. In any case if you see a HD advertised as 500 GB, its not crazy to ask yourself: do they mean GB or GiB?
.
.
.
.

Last edited by Collabora : 01-29-2016 at 12:18 PM.
 
 
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Collabora For This Useful Post:
AltairHosting (01-30-2016), SenseiSteve (01-29-2016)


Old
  Post #6 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 12:22 PM
HD Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 141

Status: Harv45 is online now
Quote:
Originally Posted by Collabora View Post
And you have every reason to be confused. The answer is actually more complicated than the ones given so far. Let's take a closer look.

The usual (base 10) meaning of the prefix giga- is one billion, so one would expect the term gigabyte to refer to one billion bytes. However, when we talk about digital information we are in the binary world of base 2. The power of 2 which comes closest to 1 billion is 30. In other words

1GB = 2^30 = 1,073,741,824 bytes

There is a different notation for the binary version. For a binary GB we use GiB (GiB = gibi = giga binary), and so

1 KB = 1,000 bytes
1 KiB (kibi) = 2^10 bytes = 1024 bytes

1 MB = 1,000 KB = 1,000,000 bytes
1 MiB (mebi) = 2^20 bytes = 1024 KiBs = 1,048,576 bytes

1 GB = 1,000 MB = 1,000,000,000 bytes
1 GiB (gibi) = 2^30 bytes = 1024 MiBs = 1,073,741,824 bytes

1 TB = 1,000 GB = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes
1 TiB (tebi) = 2^40 bytes = 1024 GiBs = 1,099,511,627,776 bytes


In general, the binary version is used for memory and data transmission and the base 10 version for hard drives and storage (sometimes!). Some OSes (Windows) will use the binary value when reporting disk space and file sizes and other OSes the decimal value. In any case if you see a HD advertised as 500 GB, its not crazy to ask yourself: do they mean GB or GiB?
.
.
.
.
Thanks you for the information, please correct me if I am wrong on how I am looking at this

so we have..
GB meaning 1,000MB
and then
GiB meaning 1,024MiB?

Is why my provider are not in the wrong for adverting the specs advertised? As "GB" technically does means 1,000MB?
 
 
 


Old
  Post #7 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 12:40 PM
HD Management Staff
 
Artashes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 9,721

Status: Artashes is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harv45 View Post
Thanks you for the information, the provider I am at said that they treat a GB as 1,000MB and not 1,024MB as I thought I should be getting pr GB. With that said should I just get a refund for them not telling me at purchase? Since the package only said..
5GB Diskspace
50GB Bandwidth

And I am not getting those specs that I paid for (since they told me AFTER purchase that a GB is 1,000MB is how they treat it).
Are you using the full 5 GB diskspace and full 50 GB bandwidth they provide?
Are you mistreated by your provider in terms of level of customer support?

Why would you ask for a refund because of mere 24*5= 120 MB of space that you are supposedly not getting, when the provider didn't even promise that space in the package?
 
 
 


Old
  Post #8 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 12:50 PM
HD Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 141

Status: Harv45 is online now
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artashes View Post
Are you using the full 5 GB diskspace and full 50 GB bandwidth they provide?
Are you mistreated by your provider in terms of level of customer support?

Why would you ask for a refund because of mere 24*5= 120 MB of space that you are supposedly not getting, when the provider didn't even promise that space in the package?
Not at this time
Not at all in fact
And that why I am asking if I should had been promised that space and bandwidth or if they in fact are allocating as stated. This is why I brought this up before I "jump the gun".
 
 
 


Old
  Post #9 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 12:53 PM
Account Disabled
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 969

Status: Collabora is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harv45 View Post
Thanks you for the information, please correct me if I am wrong on how I am looking at this

so we have..
GB meaning 1,000MB
and then
GiB meaning 1,024MiB?

Is why my provider are not in the wrong for adverting the specs advertised? As "GB" technically does means 1,000MB?
Technically, yes -- especially if the OS is also using GB for disk and file size. At these sizes it doesn't matter much. But if you start purchasing storage in the terabyte range its good to ask the provider
 
 
 
The Following User Says Thank You to Collabora For This Useful Post:
Harv45 (01-29-2016)


Old
  Post #10 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 03:50 PM
HD Community Advisor
 
SenseiSteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Saint Louis
Posts: 4,945
Send a message via MSN to SenseiSteve

Status: SenseiSteve is offline
Great explanation, Collabora. I honestly can't say I've ever seen any web hosting provider offer packages with the term GiB. A great article addressing this on io9.
__________________
ProlimeHost- Dedicated Server Hosting & KVM SSD VPS
Three Datacenter Locations: Los Angeles, Denver & Singapore
SuperMicro Hardware | Multiple Bandwidth Providers | 24/7 On Site Engineers
 
 
 


Old
  Post #11 (permalink)   01-29-2016, 04:51 PM
HD Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 20

Status: Silvatech is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Collabora View Post
And you have every reason to be confused. The answer is actually more complicated than the ones given so far. Let's take a closer look.

The usual (base 10) meaning of the prefix giga- is one billion, so one would expect the term gigabyte to refer to one billion bytes. However, when we talk about digital information we are in the binary world of base 2. The power of 2 which comes closest to 1 billion is 30. In other words

1GB = 2^30 = 1,073,741,824 bytes

There is a different notation for the binary version. For a binary GB we use GiB (GiB = gibi = giga binary), and so

1 KB = 1,000 bytes
1 KiB (kibi) = 2^10 bytes = 1024 bytes

1 MB = 1,000 KB = 1,000,000 bytes
1 MiB (mebi) = 2^20 bytes = 1024 KiBs = 1,048,576 bytes

1 GB = 1,000 MB = 1,000,000,000 bytes
1 GiB (gibi) = 2^30 bytes = 1024 MiBs = 1,073,741,824 bytes

1 TB = 1,000 GB = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes
1 TiB (tebi) = 2^40 bytes = 1024 GiBs = 1,099,511,627,776 bytes


In general, the binary version is used for memory and data transmission and the base 10 version for hard drives and storage (sometimes!). Some OSes (Windows) will use the binary value when reporting disk space and file sizes and other OSes the decimal value. In any case if you see a HD advertised as 500 GB, its not crazy to ask yourself: do they mean GB or GiB?
.
.
.
.
Really like the way you laid this out information on this. Similar to trying explain to people why their new 2 TB drive is roughly 1.8 TB.
 
 
 


Old
  Post #12 (permalink)   01-30-2016, 04:06 AM
HD Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 7

Status: AltairHosting is offline
As Collabora stated different conversions are used for different things within the industry so it's worthwhile to educate yourself in regards to whichever one is being used.
 
 
 


Old
  Post #13 (permalink)   01-30-2016, 08:26 AM
HD Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 756
Send a message via AIM to cheapdedicated Send a message via Yahoo to cheapdedicated Send a message via Skype™ to cheapdedicated

Status: cheapdedicated is offline
Mathmatically It makes alot of sense and ease to round off numbers to their next full number, tens, hundreds etc etc. The exact measure is that there are 1024MB in one gigabyte but for sheer convinced the 24MBs are rounded off to plain 1000MB =1GM.

I would advise though that to avoid confusion you just stick to the more known/accepted 1000MB=1GB wrong as it might be
__________________
Techsys Ltd | Dedicated Servers | V.P.S | Free Plesk Panel
G8 Servers cPanel Reseller VPS Reseller Dedicated Server Resellers

G8 Host Cheap Domains | Shared Hosting | SSL
 
 
 
The Following User Says Thank You to cheapdedicated For This Useful Post:
Harv45 (01-30-2016)


Old
  Post #14 (permalink)   01-31-2016, 12:20 AM
HD Addict
 
Localnode's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 142

Status: Localnode is offline
It's widely accepted that 1GB does in fact equal 1,000MB.
Google themselves do - https://goo.gl/8m3LXu

I'll quote this piece from Wikipedia:

Quote:
Since the early 2000s, disk drive manufacturers based most consumer hard drive capacities in certain size classes expressed in decimal gigabytes. The exact capacity of a given drive model is close to the class designation. Most manufacturers of hard disk drives and flash-memory disk devices[3][4] define one gigabyte as 1000000000bytes, which is displayed on the packaging. Some operating systems now express hard drive capacity or file size using decimal multipliers (integer powers of 1000), while others, such as Microsoft Windows, still report size in gigabytes by dividing the total capacity in bytes by 1073741824 (230 bytes= 1 gibibyte), while still reporting the result with the symbol GB. This discrepancy causes confusion, as a disk with an advertised capacity of, for example, 400 GB (meaning 400000000000bytes) might be reported by the operating system as 372 GB, meaning 372 GiB. Other software, like Mac OS X 10.6[5] and some components of the Linux kernel[6] use decimal prefixes.

The JEDEC memory standards use IEEE 100 nomenclature which quote the gigabyte as 1073741824bytes (230 bytes).[7]

The difference between units based on decimal and binary prefixes increases as a semi-logarithmic (linear-log) function—for example, the decimal kilobyte value is nearly 98% of the kibibyte, a megabyte is under 96% of a mebibyte, and a gigabyte is just over 93% of a gibibyte value. This means that a 300 GB (279 GiB) hard disk might be indicated variously as 300 GB, 279 GB or 279 GiB, depending on the operating system. As storage sizes increase and larger units are used, these differences become even more pronounced. Some legal challenges have been waged over this confusion such as a lawsuit against drive manufacturer Western Digital.[8][9] Western Digital settled the challenge and added explicit disclaimers to products that the usable capacity may differ from the advertised capacity.[8] Seagate was sued on similar grounds and also settled.[8][10]

Because of its physical design, the capacity of modern computer random access memory devices, such as DIMM modules, is always a multiple of a power of 1024. It is thus convenient to use prefixes denoting powers of 1024, known as binary prefixes, in describing them. For example, a memory capacity of 1073741824bytes is conveniently expressed as 1 GiB rather than as 1.074 GB. The former specification is, however, often quoted as 1 GB when applied to random access memory.[11]

Software allocates memory in varying degrees of granularity as needed to fulfill data structure requirements and binary multiples are usually not required. Other computer capacities and rates, like storage hardware size, data transfer rates, clock speeds, operations per second, etc., do not depend on an inherent base, and are usually presented in decimal units. For example, the manufacturer of a "300 GB" hard drive is claiming a capacity of 300000000000bytes, not 300x10243 (which would be 322122547200) bytes.
I think you'll find most hosts defining GB = 1,000MB.
__________________
Localnode
24/7 Support | Superior Hardware
Become an affiliate and earn 30% of every sale.
Follow Us | Like Us | Blog
 
 
 
The Following User Says Thank You to Localnode For This Useful Post:
Harv45 (01-31-2016)


Old
  Post #15 (permalink)   02-01-2016, 01:44 AM
HD Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 22

Status: hmb-patrick is offline
Hi,

I am agree with Localnode also. Many hosting providers define the round figure for GB to MB like 1GB = 1,000MB.
 
 
 
Reply
Previous Thread Next Thread


Thread Tools

New Post New Post   Old Post Old Post
Posting Rules:
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On
Sponsored By: