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  Post #1 (permalink)   05-14-2016, 05:01 PM
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I am curious to know why when people ask about E-commerce setup suggestions that when Woocommerce is mention straight away some one will say "oh it's only good for small online stores with around 300 products".

I know through my own experience that this i not the case, having clients with thousands of products happily using Woocommerce with next to no issues. In fact I recently read about a shop owner with over 20000 products migrating from Magneto to Woocommerce due to Magneto being too resource intensive and difficult to use, he has now been using Woocommerce for over 8 months and says he couldn't be happier.

What is your take, experiences on this?
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  Post #2 (permalink)   05-14-2016, 07:24 PM
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The features you require will dictate the platform. Also, implementation is usually the most important piece of the puzzle.

WooCommerce is built on top of WordPress, which is a simple CMS. Magento is a purpose built ecommerce platform. Now a store with XX,XXX products may work fine on WooCommerce but that depends on the traffic, type of products, features & integrations required, etc.

If your client said Magento was too difficult to use, he probably didn't need it in the first place. The products he sells are better on a simplified platform.

"Resource intensive" is relative - it's resource intensive for someone using the bare minimum features, but to someone who needs all the extras it's probably not that bad compared to other options.

Both of these platforms are super clunky when they're not optimized - so having a properly optimized stack surrounding your install is very important. Implementation is the game 99% of the time, but that's after you've already defined your feature set.
 
 


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  Post #3 (permalink)   05-14-2016, 11:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Delimiter View Post
The features you require will dictate the platform. Also, implementation is usually the most important piece of the puzzle.
Umm OK


Quote:
WooCommerce is built on top of WordPress, which is a simple CMS. Magento is a purpose built ecommerce platform. Now a store with XX,XXX products may work fine on WooCommerce but that depends on the traffic, type of products, features & integrations required, etc.
I agree that this depends on features and integration but fail to see where traffic and/or type of product has anything to do with it.


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If your client said Magento was too difficult to use, he probably didn't need it in the first place. The products he sells are better on a simplified platform.
Not my client, so can't comment.

Quote:
"Resource intensive" is relative - it's resource intensive for someone using the bare minimum features, but to someone who needs all the extras it's probably not that bad compared to other options.
Sorry but resource intensive is not relative if something chews up resources on a server there's nothing relative about it it either does or it doesn't, sure there are things that can be done to optimize scripts however at the end of the day (especially on shared hosting) if something is taking up too much resources it will slow the site down for their clients possibly losing them sales and more than likely get them suspended by their host or at least asked to upgrade to a VPS or Dedicated server.

Quote:
Both of these platforms are super clunky when they're not optimized - so having a properly optimized stack surrounding your install is very important. Implementation is the game 99% of the time, but that's after you've already defined your feature set.
Agree with you here.
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  Post #4 (permalink)   05-15-2016, 04:23 AM
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We've got lots of customers using either Magento or WooCommerce, both are great systems for selling and most of the time what you use should be down to what the customer needs/wants and understands.

WordPress has many more caching technologies that work well, where the only thing we've really seen that works well for Magento is LiteMage (from LiteSpeed).

We have a lot of Magento sites hosted that were with us in the days when we actively promoted out Nginx/Varnish/Apache stack, and that worked well for both Magento and Wordpress, but somehow Wordpress always seemed to be easier to cache, and I think that's because Magento has a better "returning user experience". LiteMage handles this well as it's able to combine Private and Public caches on the fly using Edge Server Includes, whilst Nginx/Varnish didn't cut it.

With LSCWP (LiteSpeed's WordPress plugins) we are seeing massive improvements in WooCommerce speeds when the plugin has it's cache time extended to a decent length of time (28 days or so).

We think Magento takes far more processing power shop by shop, and usually recommend a premium account (with more CPU power) than we would recommend for WooCommerce, but again both types of site will gain from more resources.

If I had gone to the trouble of getting a Magento shop to function and work, I would probably have moved hosting before going to the trouble of moving it all to WooCommerce, but that comes down to what the user wants.
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  Post #5 (permalink)   05-15-2016, 05:34 PM
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I would have to agree with Delimiter
 
 
 


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  Post #6 (permalink)   05-16-2016, 04:42 PM
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So from the replies so far most are saying that it doesn't really matter how many products you have and that Woocommerce and Magento can handle it and it is just down to your own preference.

So then back to my original question why do so many people think that woocommerce is only for smaller shops with say 300 or less products?
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  Post #7 (permalink)   05-17-2016, 03:19 AM
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Something worth adding is we've seen a few more "hacked" WooCommerce sites, but this is only down to the choice of plugins and user update regularity.

Magento appears to be less insecure, but that could be down to the type of user it attracts.
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  Post #8 (permalink)   05-17-2016, 04:13 PM
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Don't discount litespeed's caching . In fact, honestly I wouldn't even compare anything WP has to what LS puts out. Litespeed does so much more. Even without their caching module (just litespeed itself), it does far and above anything a WP caching plugin can
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