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  Post #1 (permalink)   12-14-2017, 02:34 PM
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|It seems changes are afoot again

https://www.thesslstore.com/blog/end...means-privacy/

http://money.cnn.com/2017/12/14/tech...ote/index.html
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  Post #2 (permalink)   12-14-2017, 02:55 PM
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Concerning, but totally expected. Americans just need to control the Internet like the Chinese and Russians do.

The quicker the American people realize that they have not lived with the freedoms they were convinced they had, the better it'll be to swallow this bill as well.
 
 
 


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  Post #3 (permalink)   12-15-2017, 11:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artashes View Post
Concerning, but totally expected. Americans just need to control the Internet like the Chinese and Russians do.

The quicker the American people realize that they have not lived with the freedoms they were convinced they had, the better it'll be to swallow this bill as well.
my concern will be that would this means that an ISP could no longer block Torrent sites and streaming sites.

Also will this mean that with me being in the Uk i could go otom the MBC website and watch american programmes rather than get ' not available in your territory'
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  Post #4 (permalink)   12-15-2017, 01:28 PM
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The US government should not be dictating to private business what they can and cannot do. Let the marketplace decide what businesses can and cannot do based on their buying power. If you don't like how a company conducts business then stop buying from them. If enough people don't like it then the business either changes or they go out of business.
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  Post #5 (permalink)   12-15-2017, 02:10 PM
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ISPs now finally have the weapons they wanted to easily block anything they feel like, or what they are told to block, whether these are Android TV boxes, or VPNs, or torrent sites, or Russian media resources with Al Jazeera. It is a win win for both ISPs and the government agencies. Frankly, ISPs didn't even have to lobby it through.
 
 
 


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  Post #6 (permalink)   12-15-2017, 02:41 PM
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I don't think its a good thing for isps to block content but I do believe it is their right to run their company as they see fit. The customers can choose if that is a good thing or not and use that isp or not.
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  Post #7 (permalink)   12-15-2017, 10:33 PM
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In Australia, metadata retention is already happening... not a fan of this at all. Privacy is a right, not a privilege.
Plus ISP's now have to block torrenting websites - not that it really stops anyone. I don't know the statistics - but I'd bet that illegal downloading hasn't decreased much.
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  Post #8 (permalink)   12-15-2017, 10:43 PM
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The US government should not be dictating to private business what they can and cannot do. Let the marketplace decide what businesses can and cannot do based on their buying power.
Except we all understand what oligopoly is and that ISPs most certainly will be taking advantage. They all talk the talk, but none of them promised to treat all traffic the same, according to The Verge that reached out to main players, which frankly says a lot. Get ready for packaged Internet deals, fast lanes, slow lanes, etc. This highly limits innovation, user adoption for new products and is a money grab for ISPs in the long run.
 
 
 


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  Post #9 (permalink)   12-16-2017, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artashes View Post
ISPs now finally have the weapons they wanted to easily block anything they feel like, or what they are told to block, whether these are Android TV boxes, or VPNs, or torrent sites, or Russian media resources with Al Jazeera. It is a win win for both ISPs and the government agencies. Frankly, ISPs didn't even have to lobby it through.
If film and music distribution was not run by mafia led organisations leading to overpriced products this would not lead to people having to look for torrents of films.

In the UK cinemas pay a percentage of box office tickets to the film distributors and if you have a first run film this can be 95% of box office. then when you do go to the cinemas it is on average 15 per person to watch a 2 hr film, but free if you can find a torrent site with it.

so reduce these and to remove the incentive for the use of torrent sites, but it is these mafia film distributors that force ISP to block sites so people have to pay their OTT prices if they want to watch a film
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  Post #10 (permalink)   12-16-2017, 10:46 PM
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In the UK cinemas pay a percentage of box office tickets to the film distributors and if you have a first run film this can be 95% of box office.
That sounds a bit too steep. What source are you referencing on this percentage? I've had some experience in film production and the standard in North America averages 50% of box office on behalf of big screen owners. Of course by the time you get, you are diluted a few times by studios, production companies and other distributors.

The bad news is that filmmakers do not have the muscle or the money to get the mass reach thousands of screens represent.

The good news is that the Internet is trying to level up the playing field. However, even if you were to sell to Netflix or Amazon, their cut is still very large.

But I do agree. Going to movies nowadays have become too pricey, and considering the quality of movies have gone downhill, I don't see how it is fair to pay more for same or worse quality of films.
 
 
 


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  Post #11 (permalink)   12-17-2017, 05:17 AM
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Quote:
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That sounds a bit too steep. What source are you referencing on this percentage? I've had some experience in film production and the standard in North America averages 50% of box office on behalf of big screen owners. Of course by the time you get, you are diluted a few times by studios, production companies and other distributors.

The bad news is that filmmakers do not have the muscle or the money to get the mass reach thousands of screens represent.

The good news is that the Internet is trying to level up the playing field. However, even if you were to sell to Netflix or Amazon, their cut is still very large.

But I do agree. Going to movies nowadays have become too pricey, and considering the quality of movies have gone downhill, I don't see how it is fair to pay more for same or worse quality of films.
I helped set up a local cinema a couple of years ago. This is the main reason concessions are expensive as its the only way they can make money to pay for staff, insurance, lighting etc. You look at the main Muliplex cinemas and you will find they are all owned by the big distributors, so they dont have the percentages to pay for the films
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  Post #12 (permalink)   01-01-2018, 08:56 AM
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the fight for net neutrality is far from over. Many states are suing the FCC. (Source: https://wccftech.com/net-neutrality-...tes-suing-fcc/)
I would not be surprised if net neutrality will be reinstated with a democratic majority FCC.
If not prepare for some interesting things to happen to the internet.
 
 
 
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